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The power of a tree: why birch and its bark are so important to Anishinaabe culture | Wiigwaasabak

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Published 7 months ago

Anishinaabe women share how the birch tree, its bark and the traditional crafts that come from this significant tree have transformed their lives. #CBCShortDocs #StoriesFromTheLand #Wiigwaasabak

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Helen Peltier, who is Anishinaabe from Fort William First Nation, has reconnected to her culture and community through the humble birch bark tree.

For Anishinaabe people, the birch tree is a cornerstone of the culture. For generations, birch bark has been used in many different applications. Learning about this tree, the seasons and how its parts all work together has re-connected Helen to the land and her community. Along with Audrey Duroy, a knowledge keeper, Helen strives for a deeper understanding about the tree of life: Wiigwaasabak.


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